New this week on the Inside Network Job Board: High 5, King.com, Machine Zone and more

The Inside Network Job Board is dedicated to providing you with the best social media job opportunities across social and mobile application platforms. Here are this week’s highlights from the Inside Network Job Board, including positions at: High 5, King.com, Machine Zone and more.

Abundance

International Development Group (IDG)

Mixr, Inc.

PT Gaming

ReachLocal

Listings on the Inside Network Job Board are distributed to readers of Inside Social Games, Inside Facebook and Inside Mobile Apps through regular posts and widgets on the sites. Your open positions are being seen by the leading developers, product managers, marketers, designers and executives in the Facebook Platform, mobile and social gaming industry today.

New this week on the Inside Network Job Board: King.com, High 5 Games, Warner Bros. and more

The Inside Network Job Board is dedicated to providing you with the best social media job opportunities across social and mobile application platforms. Here are this week’s highlights from the Inside Network Job Board, including positions at: Warner Bros., Work4 Labs, PT Gaming, King.com, Checkpoint Studios, High 5 Games, Pandora Internet Radio and Pivotal Labs.

PT Gaming

Listings on the Inside Network Job Board are distributed to readers of Inside Social Games, Inside Facebook and Inside Mobile Apps through regular posts and widgets on the sites. Your open positions are being seen by the leading developers, product managers, marketers, designers and executives in the Facebook Platform, mobile and social gaming industry today.

New this week on the Inside Network Job Board: King.com, High 5 Games, Warner Bros. and more

The Inside Network Job Board is dedicated to providing you with the best job opportunities across social and mobile application platforms. Here are this week’s highlights from the Inside Network Job Board, including positions at: Warner Bros., Work4 Labs, PT Gaming, King.com, Checkpoint Studios, High 5 Games, Pandora Internet Radio and Pivotal Labs.

PT Gaming

Listings on the Inside Network Job Board are distributed to readers of Inside Social Games, Inside Facebook and Inside Mobile Apps through regular posts and widgets on the sites. Your open positions are being seen by the leading developers, product managers, marketers, designers and executives in the Facebook Platform and social gaming industry today.

Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit Early Bird Rate Ends Today

Editor’s Note: Our sister company, Mediabistro, hosts industry summits that focus on specific verticals. The upcoming Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit features speakers from companies frequently covered on Inside Social Games and Inside Mobile Apps. Read on for details.

Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit is headed to San Francisco in just two short weeks! Register today, June 12 and save over $200 on full access passes.

Held on June 26 at the Mission Bay Conference Center, Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit is the must-attend event for anyone interested in the emerging technologies that are transforming the way mobile games are produced and consumed. Over 35 of today’s industry leaders from Facebook, Google, GameStop, GREE, Vungle, Machine Zone, ngmoco, MHL Consortium, and more will share insights and strategies on successful game design, development, distribution and monetization.

Topics include:

  • Understanding the Smartphone and Tablet Games Opportunities: Present and Future
  • Who is the Mobile Gamer?
  • Smartphone Versus Tablet Apps
  • Monetizing the Multi-Platform Landscape on iOS & Android
  • Developing Tablet Games
  • Customer Acquisition and Distribution
  • Building Social Game Player Networks
  • HTML5 Games
  • Location-based Games

View the full program here.

Remember, the early bird rate ends tomorrow — sign up now!

E3 roundup: Day 2 in mobile app news

PopCap launching Bejeweled Legend in Japan — EA PopCap is launching its first self-published game in Japan with Bejeweled Legend. Available on the GREE network, the game was built by PopCap’s new Tokyo studio. Bejeweled Legend updates the puzzle game’s standard gameplay with a pirate-themed story and RPG progression designed to appeal to Japanese players. The game is now available on both Japan’s iOS App Store and Google Play.

Square Enix shows off new iOS titles — Square Enix revealed some of its upcoming slate of mobile games at E3. The company showed off a first look at Drakerider — a 3D RPG for iOS scheduled for release in 2012 — and Demon’s Score, a rail shooter for iOS and Android that was developed with the Epic’s Unreal Engine 3. Siliconera has Japanese trailers for both Drakerider and Demon’s Score.

Gameloft reveals E3 lineup —  Mobile developer Gameloft has revealed what it will have on display at E3 this week, and the list includes a mix of both established and original IP for both iOS and Android. Aside from tie-ins to “The Amazing Spider-Man,” “Ice Age” and “Men In Black 3″ movies, Gameloft will also be showing off new titles like its racing game Asphalt 7: Heat, From Paris to Rio, strategy title Kingdoms & Lords, and its new sci-fi-themed civilization sim Cosmic Colony.

Samsung increasing Smart TV appeal by getting into cloud gaming — Samsung today announced a partnership with could game provider Gakai to create a new service called Samsung Cloud Gaming. The service will allow owners of Samsung’s LED 7000 series of Smart TVs to stream casual and AAA games without requiring an external console. Samsung has been bullish about acquiring content for its Smart TVs and has been courting casual game developers like Rovio to bring popular mobile apps to its Smart TV line.

Activision bringing Skylanders to mobile – Activision is taking its popular line of toys/video games Skylanders to mobile devices with the franchise’s latest installment Skylanders Giants, reports Pocket Gamer.

Disney follows Where’s My Water? with Where’s My Perry? – After the breakout popularity of Where’s My Water?, Disney is looking to continue the phenomenon with Where’s My Perry. The new version of the game keeps the title’s gameplay mechanics but replaces Swampy and its sewer setting with characters from the cartoon Phineas and Ferb. The game is scheduled for release in late June.

EA Mobile on partnerships, acquisitions, growing pains with Simpsons, Battlefield and Rock Band

EA Mobile is in a state of transition following EA’s massive restructuring efforts launched earlier this year. As the company works to bring all its franchises under a unified management team, the mobile games spaces continues to grow at a rapid pace. Nick Earl, senior VP and head of EA’s mobile and social segment, explains to Inside Mobile Apps how he hopes to keep pace with growth while learning from some of the mishaps EA Mobile has experienced in recent months.

Inside Mobile Apps: Catch us up on the state of EA Mobile. You’ve lost a lot of people to Zynga and EA itself is still actively transitioning from a packaged goods business to a digital goods business.

Nick Earl, Senior VP of EA mobile and social (pictured right): We view this as what’s going to be the beginning of enormous growth. The departure of folks hasn’t really affected our commitment and capability here. We believe this is going to be an enormous opportunity based on just how fast and explosive the mobile market is. You look at how the world has upgraded to smartphones and the adoption of the freemium business model and the move to [high quality] graphics, it’s really fueling the growth of this space.

Our approach is to take our franchises, of which we have very strong properties that we license or own across the board, and build these ecosystems that not only allow you to play via mobile but also allow you to interact via console and PC. We’re taking a very holistic view of building ecosystems that mobile is a part of. What we believe will happen is that mobile will be a huge growth area that will expose us to new customers, and whole new groups of gamers — whether they’re lapsed gamers or new markets — and just kind of jump in, whether it’s FIFA or The Sims, which is a good example of ecosystems that you could play anywhere, anytime.

IMA: You’ve had a couple of games with rough launches, and some games have been pulled off of the App Store entirely — like Battlefield 3 and The Simpsons. How are you struggling there?

Earl: With the Simpsons, what happened there is that we did a test and soft launch and everything was fine, we put it out for worldwide launch and demand was just so great that we crashed the whole system. We pulled it off the App Store and we’ve been hard at work over the last month or so to rebuild and address the infrastructure that runs the game. We’ve almost got that complete and we’re going to be relaunching the game shortly.

We believe it was a crucial learning experience for us [in] being ready for high-DAU games. [F]or something with really strong brand power, it’s going to drive high DAUs. So we’ve learned a lot about what the real numbers are for these kind of games and a lot about the technology that’s going to run them. So, painful in the short run, highly educational in the long run in terms of how we run the business.

IMA: What do you see as EA Mobile’s main challenge in the next 12 months?

Earl: The largest change is going to be building an experience that’s not an isolated experience on a given device but that’s part of a bigger experience. So you can, for example, tap into a FIFA game on your mobile phone, trade players, change who’s going to play left forward, change stats, and that night go home and all the stats and changes come down from the cloud onto your console or PC and you play in a tournament mode with your friends online based on the changes you’ve done during the day. There’s a lot of learning to create these cross platform ecosystem experiences and we’re one of the few companies positioned to go after this in a big way. And I think that’s what consumers are demanding.

IMA: EA is somewhat experienced with cross-platform — last year, you released Dragon Age Legends, which was supposed to be an HTLM5 cross-platform experience for social and mobile that tied into the console and PC versions of Dragon Age 2. It didn’t quite work out like you planned, but some of the cross-platform groundwork was in the final product on Facebook. What did you learn from that experience that will shape the cross-platform experiences you launch this year?

Earl: I wasn’t directly involved in that, so I can’t speak in depth on it, but I’ll just say in general that the learning we’re finding as we go after this is [...] that the experience has to be tailored to a given device, but it has to be part of a larger experience. So you’re balancing those two objectives. You want to create something expressly for a smartphone, or for a tablet, or a PC or a console — but you want to do it in a way where they speak to each other which allows the consumer to play anywhere anytime.

What we’ve learned as we go is one, balance those objectives. They’re not necessarily competing, but it takes a tremendous amount of planning, logistics and design to pull that off. There’s been a lot of learning on the technology in being able to integrate these devices, which is why we’re pursuing a strong infrastructure and a ubiquitous funnel — Origin — to be able to connect players. Those are two of the key learnings. The third would be the pure design challenge. We have a strong fundamental belief that [winning] in social and mobile — just like in console, as we’ve learned over the last couple of decades — comes down to quality above everything else. Quality is crucial and that comes down to a lot of factors; the design, the graphics and the way a game comes together. So our learning there is, hey let’s make sure we deliver the highest quality and map that anywhere anytime and that’s how we can win in the next stage of the industry.

IMA: So, if we’re talking about quality, let’s talk about Battlefield 3 on iOS. The app was pulled after low ratings. What was the learning there?

Earl: Be very careful with whom you work. That was done by an external studio managed by an internal producer. We found that that particular developer just didn’t have the skill and capability to deliver the game that we wanted. And the end of the day, that’s our responsibility and we took full responsibility for it. You’ve just got to be really thoughtful about what teams build your games, and about the communication factor, the logistical equations behind having teams work together to deliver quality. It was still early on for us, relatively speaking, so we were still trying to figure it out how to do a shooter on mobile, so it was just something where we had not developed that core expertise.

IMA: And the issue with Rock Band Mobile? Why did a notification go out telling users the game would no longer be playable on their device?

Earl: It was just an error. That notification should never have gone out and it won’t happen again. It’s still available. That was just a learning problem with notifications and an internal communication mishap. We don’t see that happening again.

IMA: Going forward, are you looking to staff up your own internal studios or will you acquire or partner with external studios to get that level of quality you’re looking for?

Earl: I think you’re going to see both happening. Acquisitions where we can pick up great talent anywhere in the world. We’re always looking, we have a very active corp dev team that’s always trying to seek out those opportunities. We are staffing up.

One thing that makes us kind of different, again getting back to core IP or franchises, when we staff up teams, regardless of where they’re based whether it’s Beijing or Shanghai or Vancouver or Montreal, if they’re working a franchise, they all roll up to the same management. This is a coordinated effort with the recent organizational changes that we’ve made, we put this into place across the entire company. Really for the first time, every single franchise, regardless of where it’s being developed and on which device, is under one management team. So we think there’s a much better level of coordination and drive toward a single vision of that franchise. That has not always been the case and that’s one of the core learnings and key organizational changes we’ve made in order to adapt to this new growth space.

IMA: So are you soured on partnering with third-party studios?

Earl: Not necessarily. We have really strong relationships — for example, we’re doing a social game with Insomniac. We believe Outernauts is going to be a great [model] of how to partner with external groups.

There are other examples of how we partner well. We’re bringing out World Series of Poker, which is getting a worldwide launch over the next two weeks and we’re showing it at E3. That’s a different kind of partnership — it’s an IP partnership. It’s on iOS initially and we’ll follow on Android. What’s interesting about this game as a poker app, you can play on phone or tablet and if you win enough points, you can earn your way into having a real seat at the World Series of Poker tournament in Vegas. That’s a great example of a partnership that adds huge value to the customer experience. We’re way more thoughtful and very careful about how we partner with different studios, but we’re not soured on it. We’re just smarter about how we do it.

IMA: So you’ve got Chillingo on your mobile publishing side — are you going to do more with social game publishing? Or was Outernauts a by-product of your preexisting relationship with Insomniac?

Earl: We’re not ready to talk about that yet. We’re open minded about how we can take advantage of our publishing capabilities. We have a long history of very strong publishing partners through the EA Partners group. We’re still evaluating what the right path is, but [Insomniac] is an existing relationship, they’re just such a strong studio and such strong designers that we felt it made sense to partner this way. It’s still up in the air as to how we’re going to go down that path. What I will say is that we have a very strong infrastructure, we nailed it with Chillingo and mobile so we want to continue to expand there and just see what happens on the social side.

IMA: So how does PopCap fit in? They have their own IP that’s already killing it on mobile and still going strong on social.

Earl: They’re following the exact same playbook. Six labels cover all development for EA and PopCap is one of the six. They have a unique set of properties that have been very strong on mobile. Bejeweled Blitz is our number one earner on mobile. But they’re really going after the same integrated, holistic view going forward and again [we can] take advantage of PopCap’s innovation and design and match it up with the infrastructure and publishing capabilities of EA to pursue this initiative. They’re absolutely key to this whole initiative as much as EA Sports, as much as Maxis.

IMA: How does Origin fit in? You’ve called it a funnel, but it’s also an online store. Are we going to see it become more integrated with mobile games?

Earl: We’re going to do that step-by-step as the technology is made available. Ultimately, Origin is ubiquitous funnel that’s going to bring users in, match them with the kind of games we think they’re interested in. It’s a cash register, it gives us the telemetry that we need to understand what kind of games they’re playing and how we can continue to improve the experience.

The success of Origin that we’ve had so far as an online store — I think it’s number two right now — we think this is just the beginning of how big this service is. So every game inside the company is going to support it and attach to it, and the funnel in how we acquire potential users is going to come from Origin more than anywhere else. We think this is a huge competitive advantage in the long term, so kick the creation of a platform, matching it to really quality IP that are available anytime anywhere is really the singular vision for the company.

IMA: What do you think of the growing competition from GREE and DeNA entering North America?

Earl: I don’t know if I can speak directly about what they’re doing or not doing. We view everyone as strong competition and we don’t take anyone for granted. Any kind of innovation in the marketplace, whether it’s business innovation, tech or game innovation — we watch closely. We feel that we have a strong core mission in terms of the cross-platform approach and quality games and at the end of the day that’s what really matters. That’s what’s going to make a difference more than anything else.

IMA: What are you showing at your E3 booth today?

Nick: I can tell you a few games — Word Series of Poker, Outernauts, a massive update to Scrabble. It’s been out there for a while, but we’ve done an intense facelift to Scrabble in terms of user experience and user interface. We’re showing that on Facebook and iPhone. It’s a good example of play anywhere, anytime.

IMA: Is this the second or third facelift for Scrabble? As you say, it’s been around for quite a while and it was completely cross-platform as of last year.

Earl: This is the second time we’ve done a key update. This one is profound in many ways — it’s in fluid canvas on Facebook, giving us lots more real estate to do chat and online dictionary. We have leaderboards so that you can see which friends are playing at what time and how they’re doing, how you stack up against them. It’s really easy with one click to get into a game. The [amount of time] it takes to start playing a game is much faster. It’s got a fresh look to it and you have the ability to play words when it’s not your turn. That’s just a sample of the improvements. On the phone, you can swipe between different screens from the chat to dictionary to the game itself, to the discovery page that lets you find your friends and start games with them. Pretty significant improvement for Scrabble and it follows the same path we’ve been on. We believe it’s the real word game out there and this is going to take it to the next level.

Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit is 3 weeks away – June 26 in San Francisco

Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit is only three weeks away! Save over $200 on full access passes when you register before June 13.

With the continued rise of the iPhone, iPad, and Android, 2012 will be a defining year for the world of smartphone and tablet games. What does this mean for the mobile and gaming industries? Where is the future of gaming headed on established and emerging smartphone and tablet platforms? Join us on June 26 in San Francisco and get tactical mobile gaming tips, design tactics, successful monetization strategies, and methods for improving customer acquisition and distribution in the emerging iOS & Android space.

This year’s Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit program will give you an inside look at how the rise of smartphones and tablets is transforming the gaming industry and how this growth will affect the future of gaming. You’ll hear from over 35 mobile gaming leaders from Facebook, Google, GameStop, GREE, Vungle, Machine Zone, ngmoco, MHL Consortium, and more!

Be a part of the discussion — sign up today!

Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit is just 5 weeks away – June 26 in San Francisco

Editor’s Note: Our sister company, Mediabistro, hosts industry summits that focus on specific verticals. The upcoming Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit features speakers from companies frequently covered on Inside Mobile Apps. Read on for details.

Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit is headed to San Francisco in five short weeks on June 26, 2012!

With the continued rise of the iPhone, iPad, and Android, 2012 will be a defining year for the world of smartphone and tablet games. What does this mean for the mobile and gaming industries? Where is the future of gaming headed on established and emerging smartphone and tablet platforms? No matter the size or scope of your current game efforts, at Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit you’ll learn successful game design tactics and monetization strategies from industry leaders who will share their collective wisdom on what’s working today and where the future of gaming is heading next.

Join us at the event and get tactical mobile gaming tips, successful methods for innovation, and strategies for improving customer acquisition and distribution.  Take advantage of limited early registration pricing and register now. Full access passes are only $399 when you register by this Wednesday, May 23 (on-site price: $699).

Who’s Speaking?

Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit is excited to present over 35 speakers including:

  • Charles Hudson, Venture Partner, SoftTech VC
  • Matt Kelly, Engineer, Developer Relations, Facebook
  • Clay Kellogg, Head of Mobile Platform and Partnerships, Strategy and Sales, Google
  • Niranjan Nagar, Strategic Partner Manager for Games, Facebook
  • Michael Rubin, Executive Director Business Development, AT&T Interactive
  • Gabriel Leydon, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Machine Zone
  • Yasmin Naboa, Head of Business Development North America, GamesAnalytics
  • Chris Petrovic, GM, GameStop
  • Blair Hamilton, Head of Studios, CrowdStar

View full program here.

Remember, sign up by this Wednesday and save $300.

We hope to see you there!

New Speakers Confirmed for Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit – June 26th in San Francisco

Editor’s Note: Our sister company, Mediabistro, hosts industry summits that focus on specific verticals. The upcoming Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit features speakers from companies frequently covered on Inside Mobile Apps. Read on for details.

The Smartphone & Tablet Games Summit has added 10 additional speakers to its conference agenda. In addition to the current roster of gaming and mobile leaders, the following new speakers will be joining the June 26th event in San Francisco:

  • Matt Kelly, Engineer, Developer Relations, Facebook
  • Clay Kellogg, Head of Mobile Platform and Partnerships, Strategy and Sales, Google
  • Niranjan Nagar, Strategic Partner Manager for Games, Facebook
  • Gabriel Leydon, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Machine Zone
  • Jamil Moledina, VP Business Development, Funzio
  • Justin Siegel, Co-Founder & CEO, MocoSpace
  • Scott Prather, Senior Director, Business Development, PlayPhone
  • Shawn Foust, VP of Business Development, PlayMesh
  • Phyllis Guo, Chief Strategist, The9 Limited
  • Yasmin Naboa, Head of Business Development North America, GamesAnalytics

View the full program and speaker lineup here.

A very limited number of passes are available at the early bird price of $499 (on-site price is $699). This price will be good through Wednesday, May 23rd only, so take advantage of early registration pricing and sign up now.

Who’s next on Zynga’s acquisition list?

A week out from its Q1 earnings call, Zynga is talking about making more multi-million dollar acquisitions on the order of OMGPOP’s $180-million buy last month. Who could Zynga buy and where can they be found?

If Zynga really has a $1.8-billion war chest, then it can afford to shop strategically for studios that will provide games with long shelf lives or services it can integrate with its own games platform in the long term. While the OMGPOP buy was all about doubling its mobile footprint and cross-promotion network, we think the next acquisition will be more about compensating for Zynga’s weaknesses.

One place where Zynga is not weak is Facebook; its games have had a death grip on at least five out of the top 10 games on our AppData rankings charts for almost two years. Off-Facebook, however, Zynga is still figuring out mobile — particularly Android — and its Zynga.com games platform is young and fragile. It seems like the next major buys will be aimed at shoring up these parts of the business.

Editor’s Note: Some obvious choices in social and mobile are left off this list because we’ve heard that these studios already received and rejected acquisition offers from Zynga. They could always come back to the table in the future, but as far as we know, they’re not in M&A talks at this time.

Mobile

Zynga has made it clear it’s looking to mobile for expansion. But why invest in another iOS developer when it could get an Android expert? Google Play may not monetize as well as iOS, but Amazon’s Appstore is an Android variant that is doing extremely well — which tells us it’s not the platform itself that has issues.

In the long term, investing in established Android developers is a good idea for Zynga because the platform not only has a size advantage in the U.S., it’s also more popular in emerging markets like China and Korea. An Android developer with international appeal will help Zynga expand its userbase out from its North American hub. An Asian developer could also help Zynga’s Japan and China studios gain better footing in the lucrative South Korean and Japanese mobile markets.

Finally, while Zynga does casual well, it might also look to pick up a more core-focused developer to help it expand its established user-base beyond casual-social players.

Using that line of thinking, here are the mobile developers Zynga might consider:

Gamevil — The South Korean company currently has two games in the top 50 of the Android top grossing charts, plus a larger catalog of popular games. It also has a market cap of US$326 million, which makes it seem expensive, but that’s far less than what Zynga was reportedly willing to pay for Rovio.

DroidHen — This is the Sequoia Capital-backed company behind Android’s current top-grossing title, Defender II. For the past few months it’s been rare not to see a DroidHen game somewhere on the top of the Android charts.

Creative Mobile — This Estonian developer’s sports-themed Drag Racing games have been solid hits and the company currently has the No. 4 top grossing Android app. Given the small size of the studio, Zynga could likely make the purchase at a fairly low price.

Social

For social game studio acquisitions, Zynga is likely looking in two different directions: Asia and the West. While an experienced studio like Hoolai Games or Happy Elements would help Zynga break into or amplify its presence on Asian games networks like Tencent or Mixi, a Western acquisition would be more about finding talent than anything else.

As for what kind of talent, we’re thinking developers that can offer a service as opposed to a game — much like how DNA’s testing methods attracted an acquisition last year. This could help Zynga grow its games platform out of its too-similar-to-Facebook nascent stage. We’re also thinking of developers with experience in transmedia properties — like the studios that know how to make a TV show into a game or the ones that have experience in converting a non-social video game franchise into a social game. Zynga Slingo proves that there’s room for growth there with the right IP.

Zynga could also shop around on Facebook for developers to pad out its platform with games that it doesn’t already make itself. Hardcore combat games or classic casual titles, for example, are the kinds of things Zynga hasn’t made in the past that still perform well on Facebook and on other games portals. We’ve heard some developers speculate that if a third-party game performs well on Zynga.com, it could fast track its developer to an acquisition; if true, Playdemic, MobScience and Row Sham Bow are first in line.

Aside from those developers, here are a few that could be interesting prospects for Zynga:

3 Blokes (What’s left of it) — Though publisher RockYou acquired and then shut down the Australian developer, the key people at the studio are reportedly soldiering on in the core strategy genre. Assuming larger studios with expertise in these kinds of games are off the table, this might be an easy way to get into the core strategy market and to improve combat game mechanics in Empires & Allies.

A Bit Lucky — This Nexon-backed niche game studio has some smart ex-MMO developers behind it. Its last Facebook title, Lucky Space, never saw the traction of its predecessor, Lucky Train. Even so, both games had a lot more going on under the hood than the average social game from UI design and art to layered gameplay mechanics. At the very least, this team could help Zynga resolve its mapping issues in the various ‘Ville games.

GameVentures — We get the impression that this sports-centric developer has more of a presence on open web than on Facebook. Its baseball and cricket games, however, attract a more male audience than what Zynga’s is perceived to be and could the titles could tap into the fantasy sports league types. EA and Disney Playdom have already proven the appeal of the genre and Zynga currently doesn’t have anything in the sports category.

If you’ve heard anything you think we haven’t about Zynga’s current M&A prospects, drop us a line: mail (at) insidesocialgames (dot) com. If you’re somebody looking to get bought, check out Inside Mobile Apps’ article, Secrets of the acquisition process.

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